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Person who will fill vacant Kennewick City Council seat is no stranger to public service

Remembering former Kennewick Mayor Steve Young

Kennewick Mayor Don Britain remembers his friend and colleague Steve Young, who was Kennewick’s second-longest serving mayor. Young, currently serving as a city councilman, died May 16 following a battle with cancer.
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Kennewick Mayor Don Britain remembers his friend and colleague Steve Young, who was Kennewick’s second-longest serving mayor. Young, currently serving as a city councilman, died May 16 following a battle with cancer.

A retired Ben Franklin Transit Services executive will step into the open seat on the Kennewick City Council.

The city council picked Ed Frost to replace Councilman Steve Young, the city’s former mayor, who died in May.

On Thursday, the city of Kennewick released the names of 12 applicants who had hoped to be selected to fill the vacant seat until a new person is elected in November. A former city councilman and six people campaigning to be Kennewick council members were among those who applied to be appointed.

The council held public interviews Saturday for the candidates. They settled on Frost during the third round of voting, with four council members supporting the appointment.

Frost has a long history of public service beyond his 27 years as the transit development manager at Ben Franklin Transit. He has served on the city’s planning commission and diversity commission, as well as three terms on the Kennewick School Board.

“I believe the city is heading in the right direction, and provides a very appealing and outstanding quality of life,” Frost said on his application. “I wish to work with the Council and Staff to continue the positive progress in order to give the new council members elected in November the best opportunity to succeed.”

He will be sworn in during a special meeting on Tuesday.

The Aug. 6 primary ballot will list Young’s name along with the candidates who hope to be elected:Verhei, Millbauer and Del Gesso and Radona Deveraux. Former Mayor Vic Epperly filed but withdrew.

Cameron Probert covers breaking news and education for the Tri-City Herald, where he tries to answer readers’ questions about why police officers and firefighters are in your neighborhood. He studied communications at Washington State University.

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