FILE - A bear waits for salmon to land within easy reach as they leap the falls on the Brooks River in Alaska. According to a new archaeological study, researchers discovered salmon remains in a cooking hearth at the Upward Sun River archaeological site in central Alaska that are 11,500 years old. The remains are the earliest confirmed evidence of salmon consumption in North America, the researchers said.
FILE - A bear waits for salmon to land within easy reach as they leap the falls on the Brooks River in Alaska. According to a new archaeological study, researchers discovered salmon remains in a cooking hearth at the Upward Sun River archaeological site in central Alaska that are 11,500 years old. The remains are the earliest confirmed evidence of salmon consumption in North America, the researchers said. Mark Meyer New York Times
FILE - A bear waits for salmon to land within easy reach as they leap the falls on the Brooks River in Alaska. According to a new archaeological study, researchers discovered salmon remains in a cooking hearth at the Upward Sun River archaeological site in central Alaska that are 11,500 years old. The remains are the earliest confirmed evidence of salmon consumption in North America, the researchers said. Mark Meyer New York Times

Earliest evidence of ancient North American salmon fishing verified

September 23, 2015 11:06 AM