Hanford

Hanford workers donated paychecks to buy a WWII bomber. Hear from the flight crew’s family

A look at donated artifacts belonging to Day’s Pay B-17 bomber pilot

The family of the pilot of B-17 bomber Day’s Pay donated artifacts to Washington State University Tri-Cities Hanford History Project.
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The family of the pilot of B-17 bomber Day’s Pay donated artifacts to Washington State University Tri-Cities Hanford History Project.

Seventy-five years ago as World War II dragged on, the 44,300-member Hanford workforce rallied to make a significant donation for the war effort.

They responded to a nuclear reservation campaign that urged, “Give a day’s pay and send a bomber on its way.”

Site workers donated $300,000 — enough to cover the cost of a B-17 Flying Fortress, christened Day’s Pay.

Two events are planned in Richland this week to remember their sacrifice and honor those who manned the bomber bought with their paychecks.

Relatives of the Day’s Pay crew will be in the Tri-Cities for both events.

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Day’s Pay is christened July 23, 1944, by Kate Harris, a Hanford employee whose son was killed in Germany. Courtesy DOE

At 3 p.m. on Thursday they will talk about the role of their parents in the war and the impact that Hanford employees made on the war effort at a program organized by the Washington State Universities Hanford History Project.

The 90-minute presentation will be at the WSU Tri-Cities East Auditorium on Sprout Road in Richland.

Stories that the crew told to family members also will be shared at 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Richland Public Library, 955 Northgate Drive.

Among those expected to speak are Wyatt Wineinger, the son of the Day’s Pay pilot, Arlyss “Duane” Wineinger.

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