Hanford

Hanford’s lasting impact on Tri-Cities covered on PBS TV show

The Hanford nuclear reservation’s B Reactor near Richland is shown in this aerial photo taken 1944-45. Plutonium produced at B Reactor was used in the first atomic bomb detonated during a test in New Mexico and in one of the bombs used to help end World War II.
The Hanford nuclear reservation’s B Reactor near Richland is shown in this aerial photo taken 1944-45. Plutonium produced at B Reactor was used in the first atomic bomb detonated during a test in New Mexico and in one of the bombs used to help end World War II. Courtesy Department of Energy

The start of the Hanford nuclear reservation 75 years ago and how it has changed the Tri-Cities community will be the focus of a public television program.

“Evolution of the Secret City: A Fireside Chat About the Hanford Story” will air at 7 p.m. Thursday on KTNW and KWSU.

Leidos, an owner of Hanford contractor Mission Support Alliance, organized the panel, which spoke at the Reach museum in Richland with PBS filming.

Speakers included Eric Boyle, Department of Energy chief historian; Jack Briggs, retired Tri-City Herald publisher; Doc Hastings, retired U.S. representative; Mike Lawrence, a former top Hanford manager for DOE; and Greg Jones, DOE chief operating officer for Hanford.

In 1943, the rural residents of what’s now the Hanford Site were forced from their homes and farms for a secret effort to make plutonium as the allies raced to develop an atomic bomb before the Nazis.

The wartime effort changed the world as it ushered in the atomic age, and also changed the Tri-Cities, bringing a large federal government presence that remains to this day.

  Comments