Hanford

Hanford and Manhattan Project featured in new guidebook

The Western Union office at Hanford nuclear reservation was packed on a 1944 pay day with men waiting to send money home. Other photos show the line stretching outside.
The Western Union office at Hanford nuclear reservation was packed on a 1944 pay day with men waiting to send money home. Other photos show the line stretching outside. Courtesy Department of Energy

The Atomic Heritage Foundation has released an expanded version of its book, "A Guide to the Manhattan Project in Washington State."

Additional information has been added to bring to life the history of the Tri-Cities area as it was picked in 1943 as the site of a 670-acre nuclear reservation to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons during World War II.

New sections include information on Native American history, contributions of African-Americans to the Manhattan Project, Hanford's environmental legacy and the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan.

A more comprehensive guide to Hanford's history was needed as the new Manhattan Project National Historical Park is drawing thousands of visitors, said Cindy Kelly, president of the foundation.

The guidebook was expanded with the help of the B Reactor Museum Association and other Tri-City-area contributors.

In addition to covering what happened at Hanford before, during and after WWII, the guidebook also covers the Pasco Naval Air Station and highlights the Banibridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial.

The 80-page guide costs $17.95 and can be purchased at the store at atomicheritagefoundation.com.

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