Crime

A Franklin inmate is accused of trying to strangle a man with a jail towel

Gene E. Carreiro, 37, is accused of jumping on a fellow Franklin County inmate and trying to strangle him with a towel. Carreiro recently was found to be faking mental illness in another case.
Gene E. Carreiro, 37, is accused of jumping on a fellow Franklin County inmate and trying to strangle him with a towel. Carreiro recently was found to be faking mental illness in another case. Tri-City Herald

A 37-year-old who recently was found to be faking mental illness is accused of jumping on a fellow Franklin County inmate and trying to strangle him with a towel.

Gene E. Carreiro accused the inmate of being a snitch and not knowing how to ride a horse before the Tuesday evening attack, according to court documents.

The victim, Victor A. Afterbuffalo, told authorities he did not know Carreiro and that he was getting ready for bed when the man jumped him, documents said.

Carreiro appeared briefly on Wednesday in Franklin County Superior Court on suspicion of second-degree assault.

Judge Carrie Runge set his bail at $10,000.

Carreiro already was locked up on two separate cases for possessing methamphetamine and second-degree escape.

He’s been in custody since June 11, which includes a two-week stint at Eastern State Hospital in Medical Lake for evaluation.

Court documents show that Carreiro had been serving a sentence in the Franklin County jail in May when he was ordered to get treatment at a local mental health crisis triage center.

He was told that once he was stabilized, he was to return to the jail in Pasco to finish his sentence.

However, one day after checking into Transitions, Carreiro jumped over a wall and ran away, documents said.

He reportedly had been told he was going to be discharged the following day. Soon after, staff members said his behavior changed from pleasant and calm to psychotic symptoms, including making bizarre statements.

Four days after running away, he was arrested for a state Department of Corrections violation and booked into the Benton County jail.

A mental health evaluation was ordered in Carreiro’s two pending Franklin County cases to determine if he is competent to stand trial.

An Aug. 7 report from a state psychiatrist says he was diagnosed with substance abuse and faking antisocial personality disorder.

“Mr. Carreiro has claimed to suffer form numerous mental illnesses in the past. He has claimed to have suffered from innumerable symptoms,” wrote Dr. William H. Grant. “Some of these may be attributable to the effects of illicit substances, but some are quite absurd and rarely if ever encountered in genuinely mentally ill individuals. His presentation at this time is that of a person attempting to mimic what he thinks it is like to be mentally ill.”

Grant added that Carreiro’s antisocial personality disorder is based on his “lawbreaking, untruthfulness, recklessness and irresponsibility.”

It is not clear when in the past two weeks Carreiro was returned to the Franklin County jail, but the alleged attack on Afterbuffalo happened at 5:50 p.m. Tuesday.

Afterbuffalo had been booked into the jail just before midnight Monday for failing to comply with the conditions of his sentence on a meth possession case.

Afterbuffalo said he was put in a holding tank and, because of a lack of spare bunks, was lying on a mat on the floor getting ready to go to sleep.

He said he heard Carreiro screaming but did not know what he was yelling and didn’t know the inmate was coming for him until he jumped on Afterbuffalo’s legs, court documents said.

Afterbuffalo told sheriff’s Deputy Ryan Riddle that Carreiro already was in the holding tank when he was booked in. He said Carreiro had been yelling that his “thunderstone” was stolen

The victim tried to get away from Carreiro but did not know that a towel was wrapped around his neck and his face was turning red, documents said.

He said that even though he could not understand much of what Carreiro was saying, he was not threaten to kill him.

Another inmate told officials the attack was unprovoked. Correction officers eventually rescued Afterbuffalo, who suffered red scratches on his head and body, court documents said.

He reported that a prior medical issue was aggravated, causing him to walk with a limp, but said he didn’t believe he was seriously hurt, documents said.

Kristin M. Kraemer covers the judicial system and crime issues for the Tri-City Herald. She has been a journalist for more than 20 years in Washington and California.
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