Crime

Kennewick child porn suspect fired from family business. Owners thank loyal customers for support

Judge rules on bail for accused child porn distributor

After listening to presentations by the defense and prosecution, Benton Superior Court Judge Bruce Spanner rules on the bail amount for accused child porn distributor Daniel Bunch.
Up Next
After listening to presentations by the defense and prosecution, Benton Superior Court Judge Bruce Spanner rules on the bail amount for accused child porn distributor Daniel Bunch.

A Kennewick man who allegedly used his work office to store and distribute a “mass quantity” of child pornography has been fired from the family business.

Daniel J. Bunch, 39, was terminated by Bunch Finnigan Appliances, according to a news release Monday from a Kennewick attorney.

He had worked for his family’s company for at least 23 years, with expertise in home entertainment and theater systems.

Bunch was arrested early July 11 following a nearly 2 1/2-year investigation by the FBI and the Southeast Regional Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force.

Detectives said he downloaded and shared child porn using a laptop and hard drives hidden in the office of the downtown Kennewick store.

He reportedly had 75 years worth of viewing material.

Bunch is charged in Benton County Superior Court with three counts of first-degree dealing in depictions of a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct and two counts of first-degree possession of depictions of a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct.

He remains in the Benton County jail on $200,000 bail after a judge Friday refused to lower the amount.

His attorney, Norma Rodriguez, said in that hearing that Bunch would not be returning to the East Columbia Drive store and would live with his parents if released.

On Monday, lawyer Kenneth Miller issued a news release saying Tanya and John Bunch are the sole owners of Bunch Finnigan Appliances and that Daniel Bunch never was an owner.

At the time of Daniel Bunch’s arrest, the Washington State Department of Revenue listed him as one of the three governors of the business, along with his parents.

A governor, according to the Washington Secretary of State’s site, is a director of a business corporation or a person “under whose authority of powers of an entity are exercised and under whose direction the activities and affairs of the entity are managed.”

Bunch no longer was listed Monday as a governor of the business.

The news release from Miller said Tanya and John Bunch “appreciate the support of their loyal customers, friends and family and will continue to serve their customers and the community based on integrity and family values.”

Kristin M. Kraemer covers the judicial system and crime issues for the Tri-City Herald. She has been a journalist for more than 20 years in Washington and California.
  Comments