Crime

He escaped by crashing into a police car in Richland. Now Crime Stoppers wants your help

If you witness a crime, here’s what to do

Witnessing a crime and reporting it can be just as frightening as being the victim of a crime. Here’s what you should do if you witness illegal activity.
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Witnessing a crime and reporting it can be just as frightening as being the victim of a crime. Here’s what you should do if you witness illegal activity.

A felon with a history of running from police is wanted again after he hit a police vehicle during his latest escape.

Richard James Rotter, 47, of Kennewick, is being sought after he skipped out on his Department of Corrections probation for a drug possession conviction, according to Tri-Cities Crime Stoppers.

A Richland detective located Rotter driving around the city and notified the U.S. Marshals Pacific Northwest Violent Offender Task Force. The task force is made up of local, state and federal agencies dedicated to finding and arresting fugitives.

Officers moved in when Rotter parked at a Shell station on Goethals Drive shortly before 3 p.m. Wednesday. As police began to surround him, he backed into a police car to escape.

No one was hurt and he didn’t cause any significant damage, but he did pick up a new charge of hit-and-run.

Richard J. Rotter

Rotter is described as 5-foot-10, 235 pounds with brown hair and blue eyes. He has “Jill” tattooed on his right forearm, “The King” on his right upper arm and a burn mark on his upper left arm.

He uses several other names including Timothy Cote, Richard Engles and Richard Goodman.

Police are asking anyone with information to call Tri-Cities Crime Stoppers at 509-586-8477 or submit a tip online at www.tricitiescrimestoppers.org. Tipsters can receive rewards up to $1,000 for information leading to a felony arrest.

Cameron Probert covers breaking news and education for the Tri-City Herald, where he tries to answer readers’ questions about why police officers and firefighters are in your neighborhood. He studied communications at Washington State University.


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