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Solving the mystery of the Moses Coulee canyon to be discussed in Kennewick

Unlike other channeled scabland canyons created by the Pleistocene megafloods, the Moses Coulee is not connected to the Columbia River by obvious feeder channels or flood-scoured surfaces.
Unlike other channeled scabland canyons created by the Pleistocene megafloods, the Moses Coulee is not connected to the Columbia River by obvious feeder channels or flood-scoured surfaces. Courtesy Bruce Bjornstad/Ice Age Floodscapes

The mystery of Washington state’s Moses Coulee canyon will be discussed at a free lecture Sept. 10 in Kennewick.

Joel Gombiner, a doctoral candidate at the University of Washington, has researched possible ways the coulee was created.

Unlike other channeled scabland canyons created by the Pleistocene megafloods, the Moses Coulee is not connected to the Columbia River by obvious feeder channels or flood-scoured surfaces.

Gombiner has investigated the Moses Coulee with field mapping, geochemical analysis of flood silts and calculations of subglacial water flow to better understand the source and dates of floods in the coulee.

He will speak at 7 p.m. at a meeting of the Lake Lewis Chapter of the Ice Age Flood Institute. A business meeting will be held at 6:45 p.m.

The event is at the Benton PUD auditorium, 2721 W. 10th Ave., Kennewick.

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