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Heading to class or work along George Washington Way? Be ready for delays

Schools are increasingly worried about drivers who pass school buses

After 5 children died waiting for a school bus this fall, schools are increasingly concerned about drivers who are driving distracted or passing a stopped school bus. Drivers can be cited if the bus driver gets the offender’s license-plate number.
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After 5 children died waiting for a school bus this fall, schools are increasingly concerned about drivers who are driving distracted or passing a stopped school bus. Drivers can be cited if the bus driver gets the offender’s license-plate number.

One of the busiest streets in the Tri-Cities is about to get even more hectic.

Construction along George Washington Way will make it tricky for parents and students heading back to class next week.

The city is in the middle of repaving about 5 miles between Guyer Avenue and Horn Rapids Road.

This will affect Jefferson and Sacajawea elementary schools, Hanford High School and WSU Tri-Cities.

The city has set up a temporary crosswalk in front of the Best Western Hotel to provide a safe place for children waking to Jefferson Elementary and the Early Learning Center.

Up the street at Sacajawea, students will be able to cross George Washington Way at Saint Street.

The crosswalks will be staffed each school day, and paraeducators will be there to walk with students across the street before and after school.

Traveling to Hanford High School will be even trickier.

The district is suggesting people leave 15 minutes earlier and, if they can, carpool or find a different way to get to the school.

WSU Tri-Cities students were already dealing with the difficult travel on their way to the first day of classes last week.

Lane closures near the campus are expected to last for the next few weeks.

“Travelers are advised to use alternate routes to campus, such as Jadwin Avenue and Stevens Drive, and to enter campus from University Drive near the Wine Science Center,” officials said.

Cameron Probert covers breaking news and education for the Tri-City Herald, where he tries to answer readers’ questions about why police officers and firefighters are in your neighborhood. He studied communications at Washington State University.
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