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What’s that plant? Hike Candy Mountain Friday for the answer

Drone view of the new Candy Mountain Trail

Hikers will soon be welcome to walk the first trail from the base to the summit of Candy Mountain. The work on the parking lot is expected to finish in early May. The trail’s dedication is scheduled for June 2.
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Hikers will soon be welcome to walk the first trail from the base to the summit of Candy Mountain. The work on the parking lot is expected to finish in early May. The trail’s dedication is scheduled for June 2.

Friends of Badger Mountain will conduct its inaugural guided hike on Candy Mountain to introduce a series of interpretive signs that identify native plants on the preserve.

The hike begins at 9 a.m. Friday at the Candy Mountain Preserve Traihead, 71004 E 669 PR N.E., Richland.

It will be led by David Comstock, project manager, and Mickie Chamness, of the Washington Native Plant Society.

Friends of Badger Mountain partnered with students from Columbia Basin College, Benton County and the plant society to create a series of signs that identify native — and non-native — plants that can be seen along the trail.

CBC metal welding students created the signs, with the plant society providing content and photos. Benton County provided materials, and Friends of Badger Mountain rallied volunteers to install them.

The project includes 18 plant and flower signs. Another 10 will be installed next year when smaller flower plants are in bloom.

The interpretive signs identify native species such as Bluebunch Wheatgrass and Yarrow. There is also a sign identifying non-native cheatgrass to educate the public about the species.

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