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Expect 80 degrees for the first time this year. But will it last for Easter?

Here are the top ten 2019 Easter candies in the U.S.

These are the top ten 2019 Easter candies in the U.S. according to CandyStore.com. This year's list includes Cadbury Mini Eggs and gourmet jelly beans.
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These are the top ten 2019 Easter candies in the U.S. according to CandyStore.com. This year's list includes Cadbury Mini Eggs and gourmet jelly beans.

The temperature Thursday could reach the 80s for the first time this year in the Tri-Cities.

Better enjoy it, because temperatures are expected to cool to closer to normal Friday through at the least the middle of the next week, according to the National Weather Service.

It is forecasting a high of 76 to 81 degrees at the Tri-Cities Airport Thursday, with the high likely on the upper end of that spread.

Normal highs for mid April are about 68.

Rain showers should drop the high down to 68 on Friday, but skies should clear for Easter weekend.

Saturday should be sunny with a high of 65 and Easter should be mostly sunny with a high of about 71 in the Tri-Cities.

Highs will continue to be about 71 early in the work week.

Water supply outlook improves

The continuing rain showers may make planning Easter egg hunts challenging, but they are improving this summer’s watering forecast.

The Kennewick Irrigation District released an encouraging outlook for the water supply for its customers on Wednesday.

After a dry March, the water supply was at 77 percent with the possibility that the situation could worsen, according to KID.

Instead, precipitation in April increased reservoir storage of water to bring the water supply to 84 percent of normal for the Yakima River.

KID plans no restrictions or rationing of water at this time, but will continue to track water supplies closely.

Estimates were up and down through the winter, with some dry and some wet months in the Upper Yakima Basin.

November was warmer and drier than usual, leaving the snowpack at just 38 percent of normal on Dec. 7.

But a snowy February boosted the projected water supply to 90 percent of normal, only to be followed by a March with just 31 percent of normal precipitation in the Yakima Basin reservoir sites and the watersheds above them.

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