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This Tri-Cities nonprofit is about to be able to feed thousands more

2nd Harvest storage expansion adds feeding capacity

Jean Tucker of 2nd Harvest in Pasco explains how a $92,000 grant from Tyson Foods increases the number of meals the organization can distribute.
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Jean Tucker of 2nd Harvest in Pasco explains how a $92,000 grant from Tyson Foods increases the number of meals the organization can distribute.

Second Harvest’s distribution center in Pasco will be able to provide thousands more meals to hungry people during the next year thanks to a grant from Tyson Foods.

The $92,000 grant paid for a new pallet racking system and forklift. It allows Second Harvest to store things on higher shelves, increasing the facility’s storage capacity by 60 percent.

That extra capacity means the distribution center will be able to hold and send out 445,000 more pounds of donated fresh produce and other food during the next year, Second Harvest said.

That’s the equivalent of 371,000 meals.

“It’s heartwarming to know that we’ll now be able to provide even more healthy food for area children, families and seniors in need,” said Jean Tucker, development and marketing director.

David Tobias of Tyson Foods added in a statement that his company is “proud to support Second Harvest and other Feeding America affiliates who are tackling urgent food supply needs and creating effective short-term hunger-relief programs.”

Second Harvest serves Eastern Washington

The donation is part of a $50 million pledge made by Tyson in 2015 to fight hunger over five years. As of the end of the 2018 fiscal year, the company had donated more than $45.8 million in cash and products, a news release said.

Second Harvest, which also has a facility in Spokane, serves all of Eastern Washington and five counties in Northern Idaho.

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Volunteers from Tyson Foods at Second Harvest in Pasco, Washington. Courtesy of Second Harvest

It provides food to food banks and meal programs, plus operates mobile food banks and has a Bite2Go program that provides weekend food packs to kids in need.

Second Harvest moved into the Pasco distribution center in 2012, with the 14,000-square-foot first phase built using only donated labor. The second phase was completed in 2014, adding 26,000 square feet of warehouse space.

The nonprofit has about 10 employees in Pasco; it relies on numerous volunteers. The site averages about 2,000 volunteer hours a month.

Sara Schilling writes about what makes the Tri-Cities home, including cool people doing cool things. She also pays special attention to children’s education, schools, health care and the arts. She grew up in Kennewick and attended Seattle Pacific University.


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