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It’s famous for noisy, energetic fun. It’s coming to Kennewick

Stomping their way to Kennewick

"STOMP", the high-energy show using all sorts of everyday items to make beats and music, is coming to the Toyota Center in Kennewick.
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"STOMP", the high-energy show using all sorts of everyday items to make beats and music, is coming to the Toyota Center in Kennewick.

Jonathon Elkins first saw “STOMP” in about 2012.

The show, which is stopping in Kennewick on Jan. 30, dazzled and entertained him. It also inspired him.

“I thought, ‘Wow, not only was that high energy, but it’s something I could see myself doing,” he said.

A few years later, Elkins joined the cast, helping to bring the innovative percussion extravaganza to life.

The Kennewick performance is at 7 p.m. at the Retter & Company Theatre in the Toyota Center. It’s presented by Jam Theatricals.

Tickets still are available, starting at $27, through the Toyota Center box office and Ticketmaster.

Elkins was born and raised in metro Detroit, and comes from a musical family.

He played in school bands starting as a little boy, and he also studied improv comedy.

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Jonathon Elkins Courtesy photo

While ‘STOMP’ is a wordless, music-filled show, there’s also plenty of humor, Elkins said.

“(Audience members) are surprised at how much comedy is in it. There’s quite a bit of physical miming and clowning. Body language is huge in this show,” he said. “We’re actors on the stage, and we’re telling a story” with the motion and music.

The show was created in the United Kingdom in the 90s. It’s built around the idea that “you can make music with anything,” Elkins said.

He and his fellow performers use items from matchboxes to brooms, pots and pans, trash cans and shopping carts.

Even if you’ve seen the show before, expect some surprises. The acts routinely are refreshed.

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‘STOMP’ is coming to the Toyota Center in Kennewick on Jan. 30. Courtesy of Jam Theatricals

Also, expect to be moved and delighted, Elkins said.

“When you see us walk out on stage with the props, you feel connected, in a way, to what we’re doing. Clapping your hands, stomping your feet — everyone’s done that at some point. You’re connected to us,” Elkins said.

“People think it’s going to be loud drum-bashing and garbage can-thrashing. It is that, but there’s a storyline,” he said. “It’s an hour and 45 minutes of energy, music-making, noise and charisma. It’s fun. You won’t even realize the time has gone by.”

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