Living Columns & Blogs

Bridge in the Tri-Cities: The Squirt Gun

Dealer:

North

Vul:

E/W

: QJ9532

: void

: void

: AK87432

: AKT74

: 86

: JT854

: 73

: QT5

: 872

: void

: QJT965

: void

: AKQ962

: AKJ9643

: void

Bidding:

S

W

N

E

-

-

1S

P

2D

2H

3C

P

3H

P

3C

P*

3D

P

3S

P

4D

P

5C

P

5D

P

P

P

*Insufficient bid accepted

Opening Lead: Ace of spades.

I have talked about the use of a squirt gun when the occasion arises. On this very distributional nightmare, both sides could have used a fire hose, and it would have turned into a full-fledged water fight!

The Bidding: North opened with 1S and South made a game forcing bid with 2D. West overcalled 2H (yes, he really did!) and N/S had a golden opportunity for a big number! It was not to be as E/W continued on to describe their misfits to each other. Somebody needs to stop bidding and North finally got the message and let his partner play at 5D.

The Play: South could not take eleven tricks and had to settle for down one. At the other table, 4S was down three.

What Happened: Bridge is a fascinating game because chances are that a player will never see the same hand twice in a lifetime. There are just too many different ways the cards can be dealt and not enough time to experience them all. The odds of having all red cards in one hand and all black cards in another hand are something like one in every 2,063,140,117,000,000,000,000 deals. To put this into something understandable, imagine that everyone in the world plays bridge 24 hours a day with no time off for sleep and no director calls or discussions. On average, two players would have all the same color cards once every 14 billion years.

Conclusion: Two things should be obvious from this Friday afternoon hand: First, when there is a misfit, someone has to stop bidding. Second, if a really strange distribution of the cards comes up, look for someone with a guilty look on their face somewhere nearby.

  Comments