Living Columns & Blogs

Bridge in the Tri-Cities: Dear Tommy, Stubborn

Dealer:

North

Vul:

None

: K763

: AK

: T4

: KJ984

: T982

: AQJ5

: JT43

: 975

: K7

: A952

: AT2

: 63

: 4

: Q862

: QJ863

: Q75

Bidding:

S

W

N

E

-

-

1C

D

P

1S

2C

2S

3C

P

P

P

Opening Lead: Nine of hearts.

Dear Tommy: When my partner doesn’t like my bid or my defense, he tries to teach me a lesson. The “lesson” usually results in a bottom board! Declarer won the opening heart lead and played a club. I won with the ace and played the king and another diamond, hoping to ruff out declarer’s diamond winners. He did not like my defense and shook his head and played the ace of spades. Declarer ended up making 3C and getting a tie for top. Can you assign fault on this one?.

Dear Partner of Stubborn: Since you decided that the best way to defend was to try to ruff his winners in diamonds, partner should cooperate and play another diamond. Declarer is going to make his contract, but the partnership is saved! The only way to beat this contract is for your partner to find an opening trump lead. Declarer erred by leading a club at trick two, because he can make his contract by cashing his other high heart and leading a spade. When declarer plays a club at trick two, you can prevail by refusing the trick. Then when he switches to a spade, your side can win the trick and play the ace and another club, holding declarer to eight tricks.

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