More Videos

Childcare trainer talks about program 0:45

Childcare trainer talks about program

See Kamiakin take down Kennewick during homecoming 35-12 0:40

See Kamiakin take down Kennewick during homecoming 35-12

Watch: What weighs 300 tons each and is now at Hanford? 0:52

Watch: What weighs 300 tons each and is now at Hanford?

Arson suspected at early morning Kennewick house fire 0:46

Arson suspected at early morning Kennewick house fire

Nitro Circus performs Sept. 22 2:00

Nitro Circus performs Sept. 22

See this Korean BBQ sizzle, tempt your taste buds 0:46

See this Korean BBQ sizzle, tempt your taste buds

Protesters greet Richard Spencer in Gainesville 0:45

Protesters greet Richard Spencer in Gainesville

Caleb Olson out-duels Kenneth Rooks for Richland Invite crown 1:58

Caleb Olson out-duels Kenneth Rooks for Richland Invite crown

Snowflake melts under PNNL's mini microscope 0:07

Snowflake melts under PNNL's mini microscope

Microbes in flux 1:19

Microbes in flux

  • Real-time Four-Dimensional Subsurface Imaging 2016 R&D 100 award winner

    An imaging technology that enables researchers — for the first time — to take four-dimensional views of the subsurface was selected as a 2016 R&D 100 Award winner. Known as E4D-RT: Real-time Four-Dimensional Subsurface Imaging, the technology combines geology, physics, mathematics and chemistry with supercomputer modeling to create four-dimensional images of what’s happening below the surface. The tool can be used for studying, among other things, waste and its movement underground. Listen as researcher Tim Johnson explains.

An imaging technology that enables researchers — for the first time — to take four-dimensional views of the subsurface was selected as a 2016 R&D 100 Award winner. Known as E4D-RT: Real-time Four-Dimensional Subsurface Imaging, the technology combines geology, physics, mathematics and chemistry with supercomputer modeling to create four-dimensional images of what’s happening below the surface. The tool can be used for studying, among other things, waste and its movement underground. Listen as researcher Tim Johnson explains. PNNL
An imaging technology that enables researchers — for the first time — to take four-dimensional views of the subsurface was selected as a 2016 R&D 100 Award winner. Known as E4D-RT: Real-time Four-Dimensional Subsurface Imaging, the technology combines geology, physics, mathematics and chemistry with supercomputer modeling to create four-dimensional images of what’s happening below the surface. The tool can be used for studying, among other things, waste and its movement underground. Listen as researcher Tim Johnson explains. PNNL

PNNL invention used at Hanford wins “Oscar of Innovation”

November 07, 2016 7:17 PM

More Videos

Childcare trainer talks about program 0:45

Childcare trainer talks about program

See Kamiakin take down Kennewick during homecoming 35-12 0:40

See Kamiakin take down Kennewick during homecoming 35-12

Watch: What weighs 300 tons each and is now at Hanford? 0:52

Watch: What weighs 300 tons each and is now at Hanford?

Arson suspected at early morning Kennewick house fire 0:46

Arson suspected at early morning Kennewick house fire

Nitro Circus performs Sept. 22 2:00

Nitro Circus performs Sept. 22

See this Korean BBQ sizzle, tempt your taste buds 0:46

See this Korean BBQ sizzle, tempt your taste buds

Protesters greet Richard Spencer in Gainesville 0:45

Protesters greet Richard Spencer in Gainesville

Caleb Olson out-duels Kenneth Rooks for Richland Invite crown 1:58

Caleb Olson out-duels Kenneth Rooks for Richland Invite crown

Snowflake melts under PNNL's mini microscope 0:07

Snowflake melts under PNNL's mini microscope

Microbes in flux 1:19

Microbes in flux

  • Snowflake melts under PNNL's mini microscope

    A smartphone microscope created using Pacific Northwest National Laboratory plans captures the structure of a snowflake and then watches it melt.