Nurse Sara Barron, seen with a simulation patient used in her teaching work with WSU, first called attention to increasing cases of anencephaly, a devastating birth defect in which babies are born missing parts of the brain and skull.
Nurse Sara Barron, seen with a simulation patient used in her teaching work with WSU, first called attention to increasing cases of anencephaly, a devastating birth defect in which babies are born missing parts of the brain and skull. Alan Berner Seattle Times
Nurse Sara Barron, seen with a simulation patient used in her teaching work with WSU, first called attention to increasing cases of anencephaly, a devastating birth defect in which babies are born missing parts of the brain and skull. Alan Berner Seattle Times

More Washington cases of deadly birth defect, but rate may be lower

August 24, 2016 5:58 PM

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