In this Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018, photo, provided by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, a boy eats at South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas. Currently housing 1,520 mothers and their children, about 10 percent are families who were temporarily separated and then reunited under a “zero tolerance policy” that has since been reversed. (Charles Reed/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP)
In this Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018, photo, provided by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, a boy eats at South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas. Currently housing 1,520 mothers and their children, about 10 percent are families who were temporarily separated and then reunited under a “zero tolerance policy” that has since been reversed. (Charles Reed/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP) Charles Reed AP
In this Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018, photo, provided by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, a boy eats at South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas. Currently housing 1,520 mothers and their children, about 10 percent are families who were temporarily separated and then reunited under a “zero tolerance policy” that has since been reversed. (Charles Reed/U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement via AP) Charles Reed AP

Texas lockup is epicenter of family immigration detention

August 10, 2018 06:03 AM