Thousands gathered on Sept. 11, 2011, at the Southridge Sports Complex in Kennewick for the dedication of a 9/11 memorial that included a steel column from ground zero. At the end of the ceremony 3,000 balloons representing the victims were released. Pieces of steel from the twin towers have been parceled out to all 50 states and eight countries for memorials and museum exhibits and were used in the construction of the U.S. Navy ship USS New York. Of 2,200 pieces of steel preserved in an airplane hangar in New York City, there are fewer than 30 left.
Thousands gathered on Sept. 11, 2011, at the Southridge Sports Complex in Kennewick for the dedication of a 9/11 memorial that included a steel column from ground zero. At the end of the ceremony 3,000 balloons representing the victims were released. Pieces of steel from the twin towers have been parceled out to all 50 states and eight countries for memorials and museum exhibits and were used in the construction of the U.S. Navy ship USS New York. Of 2,200 pieces of steel preserved in an airplane hangar in New York City, there are fewer than 30 left. Tri-City Herald file
Thousands gathered on Sept. 11, 2011, at the Southridge Sports Complex in Kennewick for the dedication of a 9/11 memorial that included a steel column from ground zero. At the end of the ceremony 3,000 balloons representing the victims were released. Pieces of steel from the twin towers have been parceled out to all 50 states and eight countries for memorials and museum exhibits and were used in the construction of the U.S. Navy ship USS New York. Of 2,200 pieces of steel preserved in an airplane hangar in New York City, there are fewer than 30 left. Tri-City Herald file

World Trade Center steel almost gone

September 09, 2015 10:43 AM