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West Richland pet rescue thinks this ‘happy’ dog is worth saving

Mikey's Chance Canine Rescue is looking for help for Reeves

Reeves came to the rescue after he was hit by a car last week. He is suffering from a broken back, and treatments are likely to total more than $20,000.
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Reeves came to the rescue after he was hit by a car last week. He is suffering from a broken back, and treatments are likely to total more than $20,000.

A week ago Reeves was lying beside a road in Idaho, unable to move his hindquarters after he was hit by a car.

Now, a group of volunteers from West Richland-based Mikey’s Chance Canine Rescue are raising money to rehabilitate the pup, who is suffering from a broken back.

“The original vet suggested euthanizing him, but he’s still so happy,” said Stephanie Stadelman, a board member with the rescue. “We’re going to get him up to WSU tomorrow because they said the quicker they can get him in the more likely he is to recover.”

The veterinarians at the Pullman campus expect it will take two trips into the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) chamber to determine how to treat Reeves. The trips are expected to cost the rescue roughly $2,200.

Any additional treatment would cost more for the nonprofit rescue, Stadelman said.

He’s young and he’s going to be able to live a happy life whether he’s in a wheelchair or not. ... I think there’s going to be someone out there who is going to love him.

Stephanie Stadelman, Mikey’s Chance Canine Rescue

Rescue officials are asking the public for help paying for Reeves’ care. Donations can be made through a YouCaring fundraiser at bit.ly/ReevesVetCare. They are hoping to raise $7,000.

The black Labrador retriever, named after actor Christopher Reeve, seemed more interested in getting petted than about not being able to move his back legs during a recent visit. Several times he struggled to stand.

Where Reeves lived before he was discovered in the road is unknown, said volunteer Jessey Bement. No one stepped forward to claim him.

“He wants to be loved and act like a normal 7-month-old puppy,” Stadelman said. “He’s young and he’s going to be able to live a happy life whether he’s in a wheelchair or not. ... I think there’s going to be someone out there who is going to love him.”

Working together, Stadelman is confident they can heal Reeves enough to find a home, which is the ultimate goal of the rescue.

“We don’t take on the easy (cases), and we want to save anyone that we can,” she said.

Cameron Probert: 509-582-1402, @cameroncprobert

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