Arts & Entertainment

DrewBoy Creative gallery celebrates one year, opens Orange Show

The piece “Chapel San Juan, Mexico” will be on display as part of The Orange Show at DrewBoy Creative gallery in Richland. An opening reception is at 6 p.m. Feb. 10.
The piece “Chapel San Juan, Mexico” will be on display as part of The Orange Show at DrewBoy Creative gallery in Richland. An opening reception is at 6 p.m. Feb. 10. Annie Warren

In its first year, DrewBoy Creative gallery in Richland has shown work by more than 100 artists.

It’s held 10 original, thought-provoking, always-interesting art shows that have been seen by about 2,000 people.

It’s made a significant contribution to the arts and culture revival happening in the Tri-Cities.

But it’s not resting on its laurels.

DrewBoy’s latest show, the Orange Show, opens Feb. 10. It features about 40 pieces by local artists inspired by the color orange.

An opening reception is at 6 p.m. Feb. 10 at the gallery, 285 Williams Blvd.

The gallery debuted last February with the acclaimed Red Show. Davin Diaz, DrewBoy founder, said he thought long and hard about what color to pick next.

“One morning, I had an epiphany. Let’s make it an annual show, keep it simple and follow the color spectrum,” he said. “This year orange, next year yellow. If you know your rainbow, you’ll know the (schedule).”

The reception is open to all ages and is family friendly. Suggested donated is $4.

The event will include a performance art piece by Cameron Milton, Rachael Thompson and Claire Dann. It’s meant to be participatory.

“The audience should bring something to give,” Diaz said. “If they offer something, they will receive something.”

Musician Jaime Torres created a playlist for the show that will set the tone. It’s available on Spotify.

Nonalcoholic drinks and light refreshments will be served.

Diaz said he’s proud of all the gallery has been able to accomplish in its first year.

When he started talking about opening a space, some were skeptical that it wouldn’t work in the Tri-Cities. But the community has embraced it, Diaz said.

“I appreciate everything they’ve done for DrewBoy. Not only coming to the shows and buying art, but also the volunteer hours and financial support. It’s quite humbling,” he said.

His vision with DrewBoy was to promote and celebrate cutting-edge contemporary art. And the gallery has done just that.

“I think people are hungry for it in the Tri-Cities. I’m going to be here as long as (the community) is willing to support us,” Diaz said. “If they keep coming, we’ll continue to put on shows.”

Sara Schilling: 509-582-1529, @SaraTCHerald

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