Arts & Entertainment

New art show by Cameron and Kathryn Mills opens in Richland

A new art exhibition featuring work by Cameron and Kathryn Mills runs through Jan. 15 at DrewBoy Creative gallery in Richland. An opening party, which was postponed from early December because of bad weather, is set 7 p.m. on Jan. 6. The show is called “The Automatic Ephemeral.”
A new art exhibition featuring work by Cameron and Kathryn Mills runs through Jan. 15 at DrewBoy Creative gallery in Richland. An opening party, which was postponed from early December because of bad weather, is set 7 p.m. on Jan. 6. The show is called “The Automatic Ephemeral.” Mills Fine Art

Artists Cameron and Kathryn Mills have a new art show in Richland, exploring topics such as prison labor in the south and the Dakota Access Pipeline protests at Standing Rock in North Dakota.

The show, called The Automatic Ephemeral, runs through Jan. 15 at DrewBoy Creative gallery. It is at Confluent Space Tri-Cities, 285 Williams Blvd.

An opening party, which was postponed from early December because of bad weather, is set at 7 p.m. Jan. 6.

The party is for those 21 and older. Ms. Rhoda’s Wine Garden will serve wine, and the local band V.H.S. will perform.

Green2Go Recreational is the sponsor.

A donation of $2 is the suggested cover.

The Automatic Ephemeral features new mixed media paintings, collages, weavings and sculptures by the Mills.

Davin Diaz, DrewBoy Creative’s founder, said the married artists have excellent technique and sophisticated ideas — and they could find success in any market.

“They just happen to choose to live here,” and the Tri-Cities is better for it, he said.

The new show is thought-provoking, Diaz said.

“The images look and feel like they should have been 100 years ago, but these events are happening in 2016,” he said.

“(For example), you see the confrontation between law enforcement and Native Americans. It evokes Wounded Knee or Custer’s Last Stand, but you realize it’s Standing Rock. To me, that’s the brilliance — it’s tapping into Americana and emotions and memories to convey a message.”

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