The battleship USS Arizona belches smoke as it topples over into the sea during a Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo. The ship sank with more than 80 percent of its 1,500 -man crew, including Rear Admiral Isaac C. Kidd. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that it was “a date which will live in infamy” and Congress declared war on Japan the morning after.
The battleship USS Arizona belches smoke as it topples over into the sea during a Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo. The ship sank with more than 80 percent of its 1,500 -man crew, including Rear Admiral Isaac C. Kidd. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that it was “a date which will live in infamy” and Congress declared war on Japan the morning after. AP Photo AP
The battleship USS Arizona belches smoke as it topples over into the sea during a Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in this Dec. 7, 1941 file photo. The ship sank with more than 80 percent of its 1,500 -man crew, including Rear Admiral Isaac C. Kidd. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that it was “a date which will live in infamy” and Congress declared war on Japan the morning after. AP Photo AP

Our Voice: Pearl Harbor still a day that lives in infamy

December 07, 2017 12:07 PM

UPDATED December 07, 2017 12:07 PM

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