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  • Friends help injured cyclist without health insurance to race again in Ironman World Championship

    Mark Hoffman, 35, got in a bike wreck this past May and suffered injuries to the tune of tens of thousands of dollars. He didn't have health insurance -- despite engaging in a risky hobby -- but the cycling and triathlon communities rallied around him to raise a good deal of money for him to put towards those medical bills. He's recovered from his injuries to the point where he'll be able to compete next Saturday at the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii, generally regarded as one of the toughest endurance races in the world.

Mark Hoffman, 35, got in a bike wreck this past May and suffered injuries to the tune of tens of thousands of dollars. He didn't have health insurance -- despite engaging in a risky hobby -- but the cycling and triathlon communities rallied around him to raise a good deal of money for him to put towards those medical bills. He's recovered from his injuries to the point where he'll be able to compete next Saturday at the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii, generally regarded as one of the toughest endurance races in the world. Diedra Laird dlaird@charlotteobserver.com
Mark Hoffman, 35, got in a bike wreck this past May and suffered injuries to the tune of tens of thousands of dollars. He didn't have health insurance -- despite engaging in a risky hobby -- but the cycling and triathlon communities rallied around him to raise a good deal of money for him to put towards those medical bills. He's recovered from his injuries to the point where he'll be able to compete next Saturday at the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii, generally regarded as one of the toughest endurance races in the world. Diedra Laird dlaird@charlotteobserver.com

He gambled by not getting health insurance, then crashed his bike. Did he get what he deserved?

October 12, 2017 11:27 AM

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