Patricia Bayonne-Johnson, a descendant of two of the 272 slaves sold by Georgetown University in 1838, meets Monday with John DeGoia, the school’s president, at the Spokane Public Library in Spokane. The slaves, owned by the Jesuit priests who founded and ran the college, were sold for about $3.3 million in today’s dollars, and a portion was used to help pay off Georgetown’s debts at a time when the college was struggling financially.
Patricia Bayonne-Johnson, a descendant of two of the 272 slaves sold by Georgetown University in 1838, meets Monday with John DeGoia, the school’s president, at the Spokane Public Library in Spokane. The slaves, owned by the Jesuit priests who founded and ran the college, were sold for about $3.3 million in today’s dollars, and a portion was used to help pay off Georgetown’s debts at a time when the college was struggling financially. DAVID RYDER New York Times photos
Patricia Bayonne-Johnson, a descendant of two of the 272 slaves sold by Georgetown University in 1838, meets Monday with John DeGoia, the school’s president, at the Spokane Public Library in Spokane. The slaves, owned by the Jesuit priests who founded and ran the college, were sold for about $3.3 million in today’s dollars, and a portion was used to help pay off Georgetown’s debts at a time when the college was struggling financially. DAVID RYDER New York Times photos

Moving to make amends, Georgetown president meets with descendant of slaves in Spokane

June 18, 2016 5:57 AM

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