The Baroque Valleta, a neo-Panamax ship, passes through the first of three locks June 9 on the Atlantic side of the new Panama Canal, guided by Spanish-made tug boats, in a trial run ahead of the official opening. After a Spanish-led consortium won the right to build locks for bigger ships at a rock-bottom price, internal arguments soon gave way to larger problems that leave the expanded canal’s future cloudy at best.
The Baroque Valleta, a neo-Panamax ship, passes through the first of three locks June 9 on the Atlantic side of the new Panama Canal, guided by Spanish-made tug boats, in a trial run ahead of the official opening. After a Spanish-led consortium won the right to build locks for bigger ships at a rock-bottom price, internal arguments soon gave way to larger problems that leave the expanded canal’s future cloudy at best. FRED R. CONRAD New York Times
The Baroque Valleta, a neo-Panamax ship, passes through the first of three locks June 9 on the Atlantic side of the new Panama Canal, guided by Spanish-made tug boats, in a trial run ahead of the official opening. After a Spanish-led consortium won the right to build locks for bigger ships at a rock-bottom price, internal arguments soon gave way to larger problems that leave the expanded canal’s future cloudy at best. FRED R. CONRAD New York Times

Panama Canal’s troubled bet on its future

June 25, 2016 6:14 AM

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