The Baroque Valleta, a neo-Panamax ship, passes through the first of three locks June 9 on the Atlantic side of the new Panama Canal, guided by Spanish-made tug boats, in a trial run ahead of the official opening. After a Spanish-led consortium won the right to build locks for bigger ships at a rock-bottom price, internal arguments soon gave way to larger problems that leave the expanded canal’s future cloudy at best.
The Baroque Valleta, a neo-Panamax ship, passes through the first of three locks June 9 on the Atlantic side of the new Panama Canal, guided by Spanish-made tug boats, in a trial run ahead of the official opening. After a Spanish-led consortium won the right to build locks for bigger ships at a rock-bottom price, internal arguments soon gave way to larger problems that leave the expanded canal’s future cloudy at best. FRED R. CONRAD New York Times
The Baroque Valleta, a neo-Panamax ship, passes through the first of three locks June 9 on the Atlantic side of the new Panama Canal, guided by Spanish-made tug boats, in a trial run ahead of the official opening. After a Spanish-led consortium won the right to build locks for bigger ships at a rock-bottom price, internal arguments soon gave way to larger problems that leave the expanded canal’s future cloudy at best. FRED R. CONRAD New York Times

Nation & World

Panama Canal’s troubled bet on its future

June 25, 2016 6:14 AM

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