A three-taloned print of a theropod, a carnivore, stands out in the terrain at a tracks site in the Picketwire Canyon in southeast Colorado, Oct. 14, 2015. The canyon has too many dinosaur bones and too few people to excavate them, so the Forest Service has benefited from the help of a small group of amateur volunteer sleuths, many in their 70s and 80s.
A three-taloned print of a theropod, a carnivore, stands out in the terrain at a tracks site in the Picketwire Canyon in southeast Colorado, Oct. 14, 2015. The canyon has too many dinosaur bones and too few people to excavate them, so the Forest Service has benefited from the help of a small group of amateur volunteer sleuths, many in their 70s and 80s. Matthew Staver The New York Times
A three-taloned print of a theropod, a carnivore, stands out in the terrain at a tracks site in the Picketwire Canyon in southeast Colorado, Oct. 14, 2015. The canyon has too many dinosaur bones and too few people to excavate them, so the Forest Service has benefited from the help of a small group of amateur volunteer sleuths, many in their 70s and 80s. Matthew Staver The New York Times

Amateur sleuths on the dinosaur trail

January 10, 2016 6:31 AM