Materials scientist Zimin Nie was named PNNL’s 2015 Inventor of the Year for contributing to the development of electrochemical energy storage technologies that could be used to incorporate intermittent renewable energy sources such as solar and wind into the electric grid. In one recent project, she and her colleagues studied organic aqueous flow batteries, exploring the use of inexpensive organic molecules instead of the commodity metals used as the active materials in today’s flow batteries. The development is projected to reduce the cost of the systems by as much as 60 percent.
Materials scientist Zimin Nie was named PNNL’s 2015 Inventor of the Year for contributing to the development of electrochemical energy storage technologies that could be used to incorporate intermittent renewable energy sources such as solar and wind into the electric grid. In one recent project, she and her colleagues studied organic aqueous flow batteries, exploring the use of inexpensive organic molecules instead of the commodity metals used as the active materials in today’s flow batteries. The development is projected to reduce the cost of the systems by as much as 60 percent. Courtesy PNNL
Materials scientist Zimin Nie was named PNNL’s 2015 Inventor of the Year for contributing to the development of electrochemical energy storage technologies that could be used to incorporate intermittent renewable energy sources such as solar and wind into the electric grid. In one recent project, she and her colleagues studied organic aqueous flow batteries, exploring the use of inexpensive organic molecules instead of the commodity metals used as the active materials in today’s flow batteries. The development is projected to reduce the cost of the systems by as much as 60 percent. Courtesy PNNL

PNNL researchers drive innovation to lead the way to a better world

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