Katrina Waters, a computational biologist at PNNL, is part of a collaboration with Oregon State University that brings together computational science and genome-level laboratory measurements to potentially gain new insights into certain pollutants. By looking at both toxicity pathways and risk potential at the same time, this research could save millions of dollars in testing of chemicals important to public health.
Katrina Waters, a computational biologist at PNNL, is part of a collaboration with Oregon State University that brings together computational science and genome-level laboratory measurements to potentially gain new insights into certain pollutants. By looking at both toxicity pathways and risk potential at the same time, this research could save millions of dollars in testing of chemicals important to public health. Courtesy PNNL
Katrina Waters, a computational biologist at PNNL, is part of a collaboration with Oregon State University that brings together computational science and genome-level laboratory measurements to potentially gain new insights into certain pollutants. By looking at both toxicity pathways and risk potential at the same time, this research could save millions of dollars in testing of chemicals important to public health. Courtesy PNNL

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