Researcher Arun Devaraj and his colleagues at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland use an atom probe tomography system, or APT, to create an “atomic map” of how the individual atoms within a titanium alloy are arranged, and then manipulated the arrangement to form a special nanostructure — resulting in the strongest titanium alloy available today. The APT is one of the specialized instruments at EMSL — the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory — a DOE Office of Science User Facility at PNNL.
Researcher Arun Devaraj and his colleagues at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland use an atom probe tomography system, or APT, to create an “atomic map” of how the individual atoms within a titanium alloy are arranged, and then manipulated the arrangement to form a special nanostructure — resulting in the strongest titanium alloy available today. The APT is one of the specialized instruments at EMSL — the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory — a DOE Office of Science User Facility at PNNL. Courtesy PNNL
Researcher Arun Devaraj and his colleagues at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland use an atom probe tomography system, or APT, to create an “atomic map” of how the individual atoms within a titanium alloy are arranged, and then manipulated the arrangement to form a special nanostructure — resulting in the strongest titanium alloy available today. The APT is one of the specialized instruments at EMSL — the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory — a DOE Office of Science User Facility at PNNL. Courtesy PNNL

Making better ‘stuff’ at PNNL

September 20, 2016 04:56 PM

UPDATED September 20, 2016 06:23 PM

More Videos

  • Snowflake melts under PNNL's mini microscope

    A smartphone microscope created using Pacific Northwest National Laboratory plans captures the structure of a snowflake and then watches it melt.