Sarah Sherbert poses for a photo in Anderson, S.C., on Monday, Feb. 5, 2018, holding photos of her children when they were infants. The two babies, born 15 months apart when she was overcoming opioid addiction, got two very different treatments at two different South Carolina hospitals. The different approaches highlight the fact that no one knows the best way to treat the opioid epidemic's youngest patients.
Sarah Sherbert poses for a photo in Anderson, S.C., on Monday, Feb. 5, 2018, holding photos of her children when they were infants. The two babies, born 15 months apart when she was overcoming opioid addiction, got two very different treatments at two different South Carolina hospitals. The different approaches highlight the fact that no one knows the best way to treat the opioid epidemic's youngest patients. Richard Shiro AP Photo
Sarah Sherbert poses for a photo in Anderson, S.C., on Monday, Feb. 5, 2018, holding photos of her children when they were infants. The two babies, born 15 months apart when she was overcoming opioid addiction, got two very different treatments at two different South Carolina hospitals. The different approaches highlight the fact that no one knows the best way to treat the opioid epidemic's youngest patients. Richard Shiro AP Photo

How best to treat opioids' youngest sufferers? No one knows

February 14, 2018 12:42 PM

More Videos