Nurse Sara Barron, seen with a simulation patient used in her teaching work with WSU on Feb. 5, 2015, first called attention to increasing cases of anencephaly, a devastating birth defect in which babies are born missing parts of the brain and skull.
Nurse Sara Barron, seen with a simulation patient used in her teaching work with WSU on Feb. 5, 2015, first called attention to increasing cases of anencephaly, a devastating birth defect in which babies are born missing parts of the brain and skull. Alan Berner The Seattle Times
Nurse Sara Barron, seen with a simulation patient used in her teaching work with WSU on Feb. 5, 2015, first called attention to increasing cases of anencephaly, a devastating birth defect in which babies are born missing parts of the brain and skull. Alan Berner The Seattle Times

Birth defects mystery: How Washington is missing chances to solve a deadly problem

December 25, 2015 03:06 PM

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