Tunisia putting squeeze on extremism after attacks

The Associated PressJuly 18, 2014 

Tunisia Attacks

FILE - In this June 25, 2013 file photo, a Tunisian armored personnel carrier patrols near the Jebel Chaambi mountain. Writing on building at left reads: "For Sale". Militants in eastern Tunisia staged two simultaneous attacks on army posts while soldiers held a Ramadan feast, killing at least 14 soldiers, authorities said Thursday July 17, 2014. An extremist group believed linked to al-Qaida's North Africa arm claimed responsibility for the attacks on Mount Chaambi on its Facebook page, calling Tunisian security forces "tyrants".

PAUL SCHEMM, FILE — AP Photo

— Tunisia's prime minister has announced a crackdown on networks recruiting people to fight jihad abroad and on imams who incite violence, after 14 soldiers were killed in one of this country's deadliest attacks in recent years.

An extremist group believed linked to al-Qaida's North Africa arm claimed responsibility for the attacks on two army posts on Mount Chaambi on Wednesday night during a Ramadan feast.

Prime Minister Mehdi Jomaa said in a televised address Thursday night that the attacks were aimed at discrediting "open and tolerant Tunisia" and derailing its transition to democracy. Tunisia overthrew a dictator in 2011 and unleashed the Arab Spring uprisings.

Jomaa said authorities will strengthen border controls and measures against networks that have recruited large numbers of Tunisians to fight in Syria and Iraq.

Tri-City Herald is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service