Gravity: It's as close to space as you'll ever get

Gary Wolcott, atomictown.comOctober 3, 2013 

Film Review Gravity

This film image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows George Clooney in a scene from "Gravity." (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Pictures)

COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. PICTURE — ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gravity put me in space. It felt like I was actually there. Somewhere in the movie is a plot, but it could have been monkeys or even goldfish instead of two humans struggling to survive a space accident. I just didn't care. I was really 230 or so miles above Earth, and the experience boggled my mind.

You'll have the same reaction. This is as close to space as any of us is ever going to get.

The story? Yes, sorry. Sandra Bullock and George Clooney are astronauts aboard a space shuttle. The Russians destroy a spy satellite. The debris collides with another satellite and causes a chain reaction. Very quickly, dozens of satellites are destroyed, communication with Earth is gone and there is a debris storm in space. It wipes out the shuttle and leaves the two astronauts stranded. Blada, blada.

The film mostly focuses on Bullock's character. She gasps, groans, panics. The usual. And it's boring. Clooney's jokester is a little fresher, but who cares? Sometimes the story gets in the way and you'll find yourself wanting to yell out, "Hey, Sandra and George, move a little left, you're blocking my view."

Director Alfonso Cuaron (Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban) co-wrote the film with his son Jonas. The Cuarons deserve kudos for undertaking this amazing project, for the imagination to see it through and for their ability to put it all together. However, credit must also be given where credit is due. The technicians involved in the cinematography and the gazillions of special-effects artists deserve a standing ovation. What an incredible piece of work.

Most big-budget, effects-laden blockbusters are ego driven, and producers pack the film with needless, time-dragging scenes. Gravity adopts the less-is-more theory. The movie starts fast, goes fast and at just over 90 minutes, ends fast.

Warner Brothers, in an unprecedented move, let critics screen Gravity at an IMAX theater. That didn't hurt the experience at all. If you are fortunate enough to live close to one, shell out the extra bucks and catch this one on a screen the size of a small skyscraper.

IMAX screens don't exist in the Tri-Cities, but no worries. A friend said he caught a screening at a normal theater and had the same reaction as me. Gravity puts you in space. It is truly mind-blowing.

By the way, don't bother with the 2D version of this one.

Director: Alfonso Cuaron

Stars: George Clooney, Sandra Bullock, Ed Harris

Mr. Movie rating: 4 1/2 stars

Rated PG-13 for mature themes. It's playing at Regal's Columbia Center 8, the Fairchild Cinemas 12 and at Walla Walla Grand Cinemas.

5 stars to 4 1/2 stars: Must see on the big screen

4 stars to 3 1/2 stars: Good film, see it if it's your type of movie.

3 stars to 2 1/2 stars: Wait until it comes out on DVD.

2 stars to 1 star: Don't bother.

0 stars: Speaks for itself.

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